home_run_xlg“Home Run” is a very satisfying film, and it is refreshing to see a film that not only presents problems (and there are more than one presented here), but also gives solutions to these problems (and where to go to find them). Refreshing indeed.
We first meet our protagonist professional baseball player Cory Brand (played winningly by Scott Elrod) in the midst of a ballgame, a typical game filled with what he is becoming more and more famous for: drama fueled by alcohol-abuse and uncontrollable anger. The film dives right into our society’s obsession with stardom and the cult of personality: our celebrities can get away with more and more indiscretions, and our forgiveness (forgetfulness?) is more easily given – unless crossing what is left of our boundaries. In Cory’s case, he injures a young fan because of his anger and alcohol issues. His PR expert and agent (Vivica A. Fox in a great role for her) hauls him out of the lineup and into some much needed ballyhooed community service work in his hometown – along with sobriety and a twelve-step program. Ah, easier said than done for a spoiled sports star, and our film is off and running as he struggles with his past, his present, and where his future will end, along the way dealing with his father and mother, his brother and sister-in-law, an old girlfriend, and a little league baseball team he is forced to coach as part of his community service (and public relations damage control).

In “Home Run,” the acting is superb all-around, evident of the great direction by David Boyd. And this is a gorgeous picture that makes fantastic use of the available images surrounding a ball diamond, a country home and barn, and the many wonderful landscapes we see throughout the film. And as I said, the film provides plenty of solutions for problems: how the community can help, how family and friends can be a strong support system, and the importance of these one-on-one relationships. “Home Run” showcases heavily “Celebrate Recovery,” a successful Christian program with a proven track record of helping those struggling with many different addictions, disorders, and abuses.
It bogs down about three fourths of the way through, but then “Home Run” picks up again as it cruises to its conclusion. Is change possible for everyone? The film claims you won’t know unless you try.
I thoroughly enjoyed “Home Run” and recommend you see it. The biggest fault of the film is its predictability. There are no real surprises in the story. That said, if things would have ended up differently, I don’t know how pleasing that would have been – so you do get a sense of satisfactions as things wrap up.
This is a good film: not a home run, but a solid triple anyway.

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“Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or
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on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally
and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance
with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the
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